Assessing sequential reasoning skills in typically developing children

Laura Zampini, Paola Zanchi, Chiara Suttora, Maria Spinelli, Mirco Fasolo, Nicoletta Salerni

Accepted August 31, 2017

First published August 31, 2017

Abstract

Since serial ordering has an important role in both language development and learning abilities, the present study aims to describe a new instrument, the Sequential Reasoning Task (SRT), specifically designed to assess children’s ability to place events in temporal order. Methods: Participants were 200 typically developing children, ranging from 3 to 8 years of age. Each child was individually administered a battery of cognitive and linguistic tasks. Results: The scores obtained in the SRT by children at different age levels appeared to be significantly different (except for 6- and 7-year-old children). Moreover, the scores obtained in the task were significantly related to the children’s non-verbal and linguistic competence. Conclusions: The SRT appeared to be a valid instrument to assess children’s sequential reasoning skills. It is engaging for children and easy to be administered also by teachers and therapists.

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Author Surname Author Initial. Title. Publication Title. Year Published;Volume number(Issue number):Pages Used. doi:DOI Number.


Zampini Laura. Zanchi Paola. Suttora Chiara. Spinelli Maria. Fasolo Mirco. Salerni Nicoletta. Assessing sequential reasoning skills in typically developing children. BPA Applied Psychology Bulletin. 2017;279(1):44-50.

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Author Surname Author Initial. Title. Publication Title. Year Published;Volume number(Issue number):Pages Used. doi:DOI Number.


Zampini Laura. Zanchi Paola. Suttora Chiara. Spinelli Maria. Fasolo Mirco. Salerni Nicoletta. Assessing sequential reasoning skills in typically developing children. BPA Applied Psychology Bulletin. 2017;279(1):44-50.